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Pat Loughery's lifestream

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I believe that we have no real access to who we really are except in God. Only when we rest in God can we find the safety, the spaciousness, and the scary freedom to be who we are, all that we are, more than we are, and less than we are. Only when we live and see through God can “everything belong.” All other systems exclude, expel, punish, and protect to find identity for their members in ideological perfection or some kind of “purity.” Apart from taking up so much useless time and energy, this effort keeps us from the one and only task of love and union.
Richard Rohr, _Everything Belongs_

Filed under richard rohr

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The engaging and energetic Dr Cornel West, speaking on his new book, Black Prophetic Fire.

The engaging and energetic Dr Cornel West, speaking on his new book, Black Prophetic Fire.

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I spent a nice long lunch today listening to Brother Cornel West speaking about his new book, Black Prophetic Fire.

I spent a nice long lunch today listening to Brother Cornel West speaking about his new book, Black Prophetic Fire.

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Dr Esther Acolatsae spoke today @theseattleschool on “The Re-Enchantment of Enchantment for a Missional Church.”  She spoke about bringing the global southern church into dialogue with the global western church in ways that are faithful to the biblical story and in ways that bring theology and psychology into a mutually beneficial shape.

Dr Esther Acolatsae spoke today @theseattleschool on “The Re-Enchantment of Enchantment for a Missional Church.” She spoke about bringing the global southern church into dialogue with the global western church in ways that are faithful to the biblical story and in ways that bring theology and psychology into a mutually beneficial shape.

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austinkleon:


Henri Cartier-Bresson drawing himself in a mirror, 1992
Not a lot of people know this, but Henri Cartier-Bresson actually left photography at one point to pursue his first love: drawing. He wrote of their differences in The Mind’s Eye:

Photography is, for me, a spontaneous impulse coming from an ever-attentive eye, which captures the moment and its eternity…Photography is an immediate reaction, drawing a meditation.

Later in life, in 1983, after an exhibit of his drawings was shown at the MoMA, his friend Saul Steinberg wrote him a nice note about his drawings:

I often look at your drawings in the Museum of Modern Art catalogue. To my mind, photography was a form of gymnastics for you, a sort of decoy, an alibi for your real thing in life.

I was reminded of Cartier-Bresson when I read this Fast Company article about a man who, inspired by Craig Thompson’s brilliant Carnet de Voyage, stopped taking any photos for a year, and drew instead.
See also: Roger Ebert on sketching

austinkleon:

Henri Cartier-Bresson drawing himself in a mirror, 1992

Not a lot of people know this, but Henri Cartier-Bresson actually left photography at one point to pursue his first love: drawing. He wrote of their differences in The Mind’s Eye:

Photography is, for me, a spontaneous impulse coming from an ever-attentive eye, which captures the moment and its eternity…Photography is an immediate reaction, drawing a meditation.

Later in life, in 1983, after an exhibit of his drawings was shown at the MoMA, his friend Saul Steinberg wrote him a nice note about his drawings:

I often look at your drawings in the Museum of Modern Art catalogue. To my mind, photography was a form of gymnastics for you, a sort of decoy, an alibi for your real thing in life.

I was reminded of Cartier-Bresson when I read this Fast Company article about a man who, inspired by Craig Thompson’s brilliant Carnet de Voyage, stopped taking any photos for a year, and drew instead.

See also: Roger Ebert on sketching

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Tavis Smiley visited @starbucks HQ today to talk about his new book documenting Martin Luther King Jr’s last year of life:  Death of a King. In the book he takes us beyond the 1963 I Have a Dream speech and looks at King’s shift to preaching against what he called the Triple Threat of risks to America:  Racism, Poverty and Militarization. Smiley’s talk was chock full of good lines, as well as passion and wisdom.  #sketchnotes #sketchnote #mlk #mlkjr #history #biography

Tavis Smiley visited @starbucks HQ today to talk about his new book documenting Martin Luther King Jr’s last year of life: Death of a King. In the book he takes us beyond the 1963 I Have a Dream speech and looks at King’s shift to preaching against what he called the Triple Threat of risks to America: Racism, Poverty and Militarization. Smiley’s talk was chock full of good lines, as well as passion and wisdom. #sketchnotes #sketchnote #mlk #mlkjr #history #biography

Filed under sketchnotes sketchnote mlk mlkjr biography history

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stephanieberbec:

Our consumeristic demand for more and better coffee has resulted in austere global dependencies among farmers and families in Tanzania and coffee-producing countries around the world, of whom we are responsible. As this demand has increased over the years, once diverse farms have had little choice but to become strict coffee producing monocultures, but the wages of farmers never increased to match. What little profit a family might earn is hardly enough to maintain their farm, much less enough to buy food that, at one time, was grown and harvested there as well. 
We are all aware that vast disparities of wealth and living standards exist between first and third-world countries, but perhaps we have forgotten that our basic needs remain the same? I know we say this often when sharing about After Trade, and by now it must sound like a broken record — but this is what we truly believe:

Our survival and livelihood is no more important than the survival and livelihoods of the farmers and families who cultivate the land that yields coffee. 

This realization alone changed everything for us. This is communitas. And through this framework of communitas, our hope in the work of After Trade is to ally ourselves with those have been excluded and marginalized in the coffee industry. We want to see these farmers as the human beings that they are, our brothers and sisters, we want them to realize their own dignity as persons, and we want others to be part of this and do the same. We are moving to Tanzania to join in this struggle for justice; this is a task we have decided to give our lives to. In many ways, it doesn’t take becoming educated or earning a degree to arrive at this point. Rather, a simple reminder that we are all human, that many of us have needs, and that we can creatively work together to meet those needs. 
Our intentions are not to make this post, or any of our writings in this regard, a “sales pitch” to somehow compel our friends and readers to be part of the work of After Trade by financially supporting us—so we hope you won’t read our words through this lens alone—we write primarily to raise awareness about the injustices within the coffee industry and to help bring understanding to what After Trade is. Truthfully, we’d much rather already be in Tanzania doing this work, without fundraising. But the reality is, we can’t do this alone and we can’t help but also think that by our need of others to be part of this, the work itself is becoming better and spreading farther than we could take it ourselves. So with that disclaimer, if any of you are interested in helping, we would sincerely appreciate it. We only need 20 people to give $50/month to be fully funded. // www.aftertrade.org  
(photo by Logan Potterf)

stephanieberbec:

Our consumeristic demand for more and better coffee has resulted in austere global dependencies among farmers and families in Tanzania and coffee-producing countries around the world, of whom we are responsible. As this demand has increased over the years, once diverse farms have had little choice but to become strict coffee producing monocultures, but the wages of farmers never increased to match. What little profit a family might earn is hardly enough to maintain their farm, much less enough to buy food that, at one time, was grown and harvested there as well. 

We are all aware that vast disparities of wealth and living standards exist between first and third-world countries, but perhaps we have forgotten that our basic needs remain the same? I know we say this often when sharing about After Trade, and by now it must sound like a broken record — but this is what we truly believe:

Our survival and livelihood is no more important than the survival and livelihoods of the farmers and families who cultivate the land that yields coffee. 

This realization alone changed everything for us. This is communitas. And through this framework of communitas, our hope in the work of After Trade is to ally ourselves with those have been excluded and marginalized in the coffee industry. We want to see these farmers as the human beings that they are, our brothers and sisters, we want them to realize their own dignity as persons, and we want others to be part of this and do the same. We are moving to Tanzania to join in this struggle for justice; this is a task we have decided to give our lives to. In many ways, it doesn’t take becoming educated or earning a degree to arrive at this point. Rather, a simple reminder that we are all human, that many of us have needs, and that we can creatively work together to meet those needs. 

Our intentions are not to make this post, or any of our writings in this regard, a “sales pitch” to somehow compel our friends and readers to be part of the work of After Trade by financially supporting us—so we hope you won’t read our words through this lens alone—we write primarily to raise awareness about the injustices within the coffee industry and to help bring understanding to what After Trade is. Truthfully, we’d much rather already be in Tanzania doing this work, without fundraising. But the reality is, we can’t do this alone and we can’t help but also think that by our need of others to be part of this, the work itself is becoming better and spreading farther than we could take it ourselves. So with that disclaimer, if any of you are interested in helping, we would sincerely appreciate it. We only need 20 people to give $50/month to be fully funded. // www.aftertrade.org  

(photo by Logan Potterf)

(Source: stephanieberbec)

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Sometimes in a lowly cell, in the presence of my God

I stand and listen.

In the silence of my heart I can hear his will

When I listen despairing people flock to me

They expect that I can see the answers

They ask my advice, they say I am wise

I answer that nothing can deceive me, if I stand alone and silently listen

For I am but a servant who is guided by his king, when I listen

Sometimes in a lowly cell in the presence of my God I stand and listen

St. Columba of Iona

Filed under columba st Columba wisdom leadership listening quotes

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If you want to identify me, ask me not where I live, or what I like to eat, or how I comb my hair, but ask me what I am living for, in detail, ask me what I think is keeping me from living fully for the thing I want to live for.
Thomas Merton (via observando)